Kakadu National Park, NT

Before you go camping in Kakadu, read our guide to the NT National Park, including how to get there, where to camp, aboriginal art and what permits you will require.

For many of us, Kakadu in the Northern Territory represents the pinnacle of Australian beauty. Vast, remote, harsh yet strikingly beautiful, it’s what we ache for as travellers of this wide, brown land. People talk about bucket-list destinations, and Kakadu is certainly that. Before you embark on your journey, here's what you need to know.

Kakadu NP information and attractions


Kakadu National Park is as close to Arnhem Land as you’re likely to get, and suffice it to say, the astounding wildlife boggles the suburban brain.

Kakadu is the darling of the NT. Her beautiful wetlands are famous throughout the world and the park is remarkable well-maintained, which is impressive given its size and frequent exposure to torrential rain.

Camper Trailer Camping

Kakadu National Park: Camping

NT Parks and Wildlife offers guided tours at the more accessible campgrounds and is forever renewing her tracks. Naturally, Kakadu is a widely-sought travel destination, but the quality and quantity of her campsites make bypassing the flurry of day tourists an easy affair.

Find Kakadu National Park campgrounds


Kakadu National Park: Itinerary

Kakadu NP is one of only four Australian sites World Heritage listed for both cultural and natural reasons. As such it sees nearly 200,000 people visiting each year. Determined not to be put off by the crowds, writer Amanda Burton headed in to tick off another ‘must see’ from her travel list - follow her itinerary.

Find Kakadu National Park itinerary


Entrances and permits

Kakadu National Park measures in at 19,804 sq km, with two major entrances: 149km north of Katherine, and 133km east of Darwin. Be aware that some areas of Kakadu have restricted visiting times due to seasonal closures, and others are not open to the general public or are only accessible with a permit. The waterfalls may only run seasonally.

Find out more about visiting Kakadu National Park

Aboriginal Art

Aboriginal art

Aboriginal people have occupied the Kakadu area continuously for at least 40,000 years, and the park is rich in Aboriginal cultural sites. About 500 Aboriginal people still live in the park, which is described as having one of the largest collections of Aboriginal rock art anywhere in the world.

Find out more about Aboriginal art in Kakadu

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Want to visit Kakadu, NT? Book accommodation online now on turu.com.au.